Monday Markets: From Filipino fiction to travel writing

Filipino Fiction For Young Adults: “Open Call For Submissions–Science Fiction: Filipino Fiction For Young Adults – Editors Dean Francis Alfar (publisher of the Philippine Speculative Fiction anthologies) and Kenneth Yu (publisher of Philippine Genre Stories), and co-editors for Horror: Filipino Fiction For Young Adults, announce an open call for short fiction submissions for Science Fiction: Filipino Fiction for Young Adults.”

Till Death Do Us Part: “Burnt Offerings Books is planning on publishing a series of monthly anthologies in 2014. The tentative title and theme of the anthology will be Till Death Do Us Part.”

Thirteen Press Anthologies (scroll down to Feb. 6 entry) – Accepting submissions for three anthologies – War, Wildwood, and Pyromania.

Dark Heart Volume Two: “With the theme of ‘Mirrors and Tears’ writers (both new and established) are invited to write a short story from 1,000-10,000 words for this anthology. The theme is open to interpretation and we look forward to reading a diverse range of YA tales.”

The Best Women’s Travel Writing: “Women writers, please send us your best stories about travel throughout the world for our annual series, The Best Women’s Travel Writing. We’re looking for the full range of experience: adventurous, mystical, funny, poignant, cuisine-related, cross-cultural, transformational, funny, illuminating, frightening, or grim-as well as solo travel and travel with friends, partners, and families.”

 

 

 

March into Markets: Audio Magazine, Down-Under Literary, and more

Cast of Wonders: The YA Sci-fi & Fantasy Audio Magazine — “Cast of Wonders is a YA Sci-Fi & Fantasy fiction podcast, but we don’t rigidly define the genre. We’re looking for stories that evoke a sense of wonder, that have something unreal about them. We aim for a 12-17 age range: that means sophisticated, non-condescending stories with wide appeal, and without explicit sex, violence or strong language. Think Harry Potter or The Hunger Games.”

The School Magazine — “What is The School Magazine? It is Australia’s most loved and longest-running literary magazine for children. For generations, it has been introducing young readers to a world of words.”

Kindle Singles program sells over 2 million short stories — “Last year, Amazon began offering its affordable, bite-sized Kindle Singles for sale. Kindle Singles have a length that’s smaller than books, but longer than most magazine articles — essentially, short stories. But until now, no data existed on exactly how well these Singles are selling. ”

Five hundred new fairytales discovered in Germany — “Collection of fairytales gathered by historian Franz Xaver von Schönwerth had been locked away in an archive in Regensburg for over 150 years.”

Spring Cleaning: New YA market and voice for kids

A recent spring-cleaning session unearthed the following sites:

Sucker Literary Magazine — “I am a rare specimen–an (online/electronic) literary magazine dedicated to showcasing and promoting undiscovered and established writers who write for young adults…. I am open to any and all writers at any and all stages  of their writing career/ journey into the publishing world.”

K.I.D. VOICE —  “K.I.D (Keeping it Diverse) VOICE is an online newspaper, launching in May 2012, that will feature submissions written for and by kids like you, of diverse age, gender and nationality.   Our goal is to open up the world of literacy and learning by keeping it engaging and diverse.”

New Moon Publishes Young Writers

New Moon Girls is an online community and magazine where girls create and share poetry, artwork, videos, and more; chat together; and learn. All in a fully moderated, educational environment designed to build self-esteem and positive body image.

Love to write? Share all your fabulous fiction here! Publish your newest creations, or get advice on works-in-progress. And read great stories by other New Moon Girls!”

Hunger Mountain 2012 Submission Calls and Ebook Publishers

Calling all YA writers: check out Bethany’s blog posting for an update on Hunger Mountain’s writing needs – “Jan-March 2012: The Mystery & Magic of Identity – Hunger Mountain is actively seeking submissions for the Winter 2012 issue The Mystery and Magic of Identity.” Click here for all the info.

And I just came across Books to Go, an ebook publisher of short stories (YA and older, all genres). More and more electronic publishers are moving into the short story world, so I plan to put together a list of these publishers for Word Crushes soon. Stay tuned.

Teen Voices: Where young writers speak though print

I was thrilled when Sarah Binning, Marketing Coordinator for Teen Voices, emailed me, saying that Word Crushes had caught her attention. She wondered if I would be willing to help spread the word about Teen Voices. And, of course, I’d be happy to. So here’s the scoop:

Teen Voices is an intensive journalism mentoring and leadership development program for teen girls in Boston whose mission is to support and educate teen girls to amplify their voices and create social change through media.

2011 marked its 20th year of print publication. To commemorate this achievement, the cover of the Spring/Summer issue featured twenty faces of readers and teen editors of Teen Voices to showcase the diversity of readers. Additionally, it held a “20 under 20” short story competition for teen girls (check out the winners here).

Through the Teen Voices program, girls create an internationally distributed print and online alternative magazine reaching 45,000 readers worldwide and receiving more than 200,000 annual page-views from 175 countries. And it remains the only alternative magazine by and for teen girls in the nation.

Ezine weaves tapestry of excellent writing: Interview with YARN editor

 “‘I want to be abducted by aliens,’ Attison said as he shoveled a spoonful of tuna into his mouth.” From:  Swamp Monster Bonanza By Michele Tallarita

“The 7-11 is empty, so I count the hairs on the third finger of my left hand.” From: Stubb  By Arthur Slade

“Any minute Ms. Morris will call the girls up on stage.  The cattle call.” From: In the Spotlight by Emily S. Deibel

Whew! Does it get any better than that? First lines that pull you in, making the computer screen disappear until all you see is a story unfolding word by word. Yet, this is exactly what I’ve come to expect from YARN–an online magazine packed with essays, poems, and fiction for teens. And YARN never fails to deliver.

In the following intervew, YA Consultant and Reader Lourdes Keochgerien discusses how YARN got its start, types of stories she is looking for, and what to expect in the future:

What inspired YARN? How did it get its start?  

Back in the winter of 2008, Kerri Majors, co-editor, started writing a short story for young adults. After a little online research, she discovered how few venues exist for such writing. That story became a novel, so she didn’t wind up needing a YA literary journal, but ever since then, she’s wanted to start a journal that featured YA writing. After talking about it on-and-off with writer friends like Shannon, co-founder/co-editor of YARN, Kerri decided it was time to make the dream a reality in the summer of 2009.

What do you look for in a story? Are there any specific types of stories or plots that you wish writers would send you?

The story should be for a teen audience and honestly portray situations this audience can relate to, without losing their respect along the way. It’s also important that the story ring true, reel us in from the first words, and keep our interest from sentence to sentence. There is no one way to do this, of course, and we want stories that are as quirky and unique as possible. And people say writing YA is easy!

Believe it or not, despite the popularity of sci-fi, fantasy, and steampunk in YA novels, we don’t see many short stories in those genres.

Why would you pass on a story?

We’ve passed on stories for many reasons: sometimes it was because they were more for a children’s or adult audience, and sometimes it was because the story wasn’t well enough thought out, and still other times it was because, well, it just didn’t float our boat. This is a very subjective process, and because we’re all writers ourselves, we know how frustrating it can be. The important thing for writers to remember is to keep working on their craft, and keep sending out their work.

What do you enjoy the most about editing YARN?

All the editors can agree that one of the most wonderful things about editing YARN is discovering new talent, adult and teen, and helping those writers shape their stories into publishable work. We are very hands-on editors, willing to work with a writer who has promise. With teen writers especially, it’s exciting to see exuberance in their prose. The love they have for reading and writing will live on for a very long time.

Who are some of your favorite authors and why?

There are so many wonderful YA writers today, it is difficult to narrow the list down to a few. All the authors that we have had the opportunity to interview and publish can be found on our favorites list including: Barry Lyga, Malinda Lo, Pete Hautman, Allen Zadoff, Arthur Slade, Mitali Perkins, and Tina Ferraro just to name a few. Each author offers such an unique prespective on adolescence with heart, humor, and honestly.

Anything new coming to YARN this year?

Well, we don’t want to give away all our secrets, but we can tell you that we will have new short stories by Kody Keplinger and John M. Cusick, an interview with Gail Giles, new editors’ blogs, and of course, new publications from the brightest new fiction, non-fiction, and poetry writers in YA.

New(ish) Market Alert: Ezine seeks best YA fantasy, scifi, and horror

Scape: “Simply put, Scape is a fantasy, science fiction and horror e-zine with a young adult (YA) focus.  We seek the best new short YA speculative stories, poetry and art.  We also publish news and reviews on books, movies and trends in the speculative YA world.”

And while you’re at it, check out this excellent post on submitting YA short fiction: The YA Highway Quickstart Guide to Submitting Short Fiction

New Christian YA Market Looking For Submissions

Untapped–a new imprint and magazine for Christian teens and tweens from Written World Communications–is on the hunt for outstanding fiction and non-fiction writers.

In the following interview, Executive Editor Christina Harris (Untapped.mag@gmail.com) discusses what she’s looking for, her favorite writers, and plans for the publication of the imprint’s first novel and magazine.

What do you look for in a story? Are there any specific types of stories or plots that you wish writers would send you? 

Strong author voice, logical and original plots fit for the YA audience, and real characters. I’m a huge fan of YA speculative and I wish there were more out there in that genre that are better than the average or just non-occult. Saying that, I also would love to receive pretty much anything, be it set as wild west or contemporary, that fits my criteria that I mentioned before. It is definitely hard to find.

Why would you pass on a story? 

Weak voice, bad writing style, “bunny trails” in the plot, lack of conflict in the story, stories that are “written down” for YA teens (I cannot tell you how many times I’ve seen submissions that are geared toward too young of an audience), and the immoral depicted as good. (Please don’t send me something about a Christian Vampire or Witch! Although there can be evil vampires and witches if it’s part of the plot.)

What do you enjoy the most about editing? 

Exploring another soul’s unique God given gift. I get to be the first to review something that someone poured their heart into and I can help them live their dream of getting the manuscript published. It also makes that the hardest part of my job here because if I find I can’t publish it, I (because I also love to write fiction) know how it is to devote so much time and then find out your story won’t take off or that the entire novel needs a rewrite.

Who are some of your favorite authors and why? Favorite short stories? Is there a story (or two) that was completely unforgettable… changed your life or outlook in some way? 

Even though I’ve said I love speculative fiction, there is one book that always sticks in my mind that is not speculative at all: The Blue Castle by L.M. Montegomery. Most people haven’t heard of this novel, but I picked that little book up and couldn’t put it down until the end. Set in the early twentieth century, the story is about Delancy Stirling who is 29 and an old maid. She never really lived life. One day when she finds out she only has a year to live, she throws caution to the wind and even asks a man to marry her! I laughed, got angry with the characters who treated her unfairly, and cried for Delancy during her adventures. The ending is absolutely beautiful!

Anything new coming to Untapped this year? 

We’re hoping to release for the first time a magazine and also publish our first novel.